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New method to visualize the action of bacteriophages in real time

Scientists at RPC "MicroMir" were the first to use a 3D Cell Explorer microscope to visualize phage lysis of bacteria in real time.
RPC "Micromir"
Scientists at RPC "MicroMir" were the first to use a 3D Cell Explorer microscope (Nanolive, Switzerland) to visualize phage lysis of bacteria in real time. The results are published in Viruses.
You are welcome to cite the materials, but be sure to provide an active link to the site. Thank you!
Scientists at RPC "MicroMir" were the first to use a 3D Cell Explorer microscope (Nanolive, Switzerland) to visualize phage lysis of bacteria in real time. The results are published in Viruses.
You are welcome to cite the materials, but be sure to provide an active link to the site. Thank you!
In this study, a cell culture of Klebsiella pneumoniae and a cocktail of 3 virulent bacteriophages were used. K. pneumoniae is associated with human diseases such as pneumonia, urogenital infection, liver abscess, bloodstream infection, etc. It is one of the most frequently detected bacteria in human respiratory tract infections, especially in hospitalized patients with pneumonia associated with treatment in intensive care units (ICU), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) [1]. Among bacterial complications after viral respiratory tract infections, including SARS-CoV-2, pneumonia associated with K. pneumoniae is also the most common [2,3]. The treatment of such complications is challenged by increasing levels of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs.

A video of bacterial culture growth and the initial stages of biofilm formation was filmed during the experiment. Two and a half hours after the addition of bacteriophages to the system, active lysis of the bacterial cells began and within 30 minutes all microcolonies were disrupted.
  1. Zhang, Y.; Yao, Z.; Zhan, S.; Yang, Z.; Wei, D.; Zhang, J.; Li, J.; Kyaw, M.H. Disease burden of intensive care unit-acquired 528 pneumonia in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Infect Dis 2014, 29, 84-90. 529 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2014.05.030 530

  2. Zhu X.; Ge Y.; Wu T.; Zhao K.; Chen Y.; Wu B.; Zhu F.; Zhu B.; Cui L. Co-infection with respiratory pathogens among COVID- 531 2019 cases. Virus Res 2020, 285, 198005. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2020.198005 532

  3. Mirzaei R.; Goodarzi P.; Asadi M.; Soltani A.; Aljanabi H.A.A.; Jeda A.S.; Dashtbin S.; Jalalifar S.; Mohammadzadeh R.; Teimoori 533 A.; Tari K.; Salari M.; Ghiasvand S.; Kazemi S.; Yousefimashouf R.; Keyvani H.; Karampoor S. Bacterial co-infections with SARS- 534 CoV-2. IUBMB Life 2020, 72(10), 2097-2111. https://doi.org/10.1002/iub.2356

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